Links & Resources
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Playing, Artists, & Instruments

[Brother Steve's Whistle Site] contains extensive information on playing the whistle, including a fine tutorial on traditional ornamentation.

[Rob Greenway's Irish Flute Page] contains excellent material on playing the flute, including an ornamentation tutorial that covers a few topics not normally addressed in online tutors.

[Woodenflute.com] has a good introduction to what Irish flute is and how to go about buying one.  Also the home page of the very valuable woodenflute mailing list.

[Brad Hurley's Irish Flute Guide] is a terrific site for learning about Irish flutes, finding a flute, or researching different musicians.  Strongly recommended for those new to the Irish flute.

[The Standing Stones "What is an Irish Flute" Pages] this is excellent historical material on how the wooden concert flute came to be used in Irish music, and on flutes in general.

[Oldflutes] a great page with information on antique flutes and flute history.  Comprehensive and well researched.

[Folkers & Powell Flutes] makers of historical copies of Baroque flutes and early keyed flutes, also Renaissance flutes.  Lovely photos and sound samples of some of the best flutes for early performance made today.

An article describing various oils and their effects on wooden recorders, also valuable for wooden flutes or other wooden instruments:  Wood Oil & Water.

Information, Fingering Charts, and sound samples of the Baroque Flute (including Irish music!):  Lars' Baroque Flute Corner.

A site listing extensive fingering charts for the whistle, most of which work on wooden flutes: The Tinwhistle Fingerings Research Center.

Site that lists information on the differing regional styles of flute playing in Ireland:  The Flow

Online Music Resources

[Arkansas Celtic Music Society] has several sessions a month in central Arkansas at Little Rock, Hot Springs Village, and Conway.

[Chiff and Fipple] Dale Wisely's excellent site on the pennywhistle and Irish music.  Uniquely infomative and humorous, and has a great message board, very active and with a large and diverse membership.  Warning:  the message board occasionally contains postings inappropriate for children.

[BBC Virtual Session] probably the single best learning resource online.  You can play along with a real Irish session!  Includes an onscreen score if you are a music reader.  Great fun!!!

[JC's ABC Tune Finder] is a valuable tool when you are trying to find the music for a tune.  You can search by name, tune fragment, or even the contour (shape) of the tune.  Will display the tune onscreen or return an ABC file.

[LeSession] has an ABC tutorial for learning to read and write this popular music format, tunebooks, and FAQs.

[The Session] is a large online repository of tunes indexed by recording and artist, with commentary.

[Ceolas] a great place to start learning about Irish music and the instruments that are played in it.

[The Fiddler's Companion] has background information on most traditional tunes--good stuff.

[Gaelic Crossings] a very safe and reputable place to buy instruments and music.  Also has a great message board.

www.tunedb.org:  another great collection of traditional tunes in ABC format

Flute Makers

Skip Healy makes keyed, unkeyed, and customized wooden flutes, fifes, and piccolos and hosts an annual wooden flute symposium (www.windonthebay.com) www.skiphealy.com .

World-famous maker of some of the finest whistles and flutes:  Michael Copeland.  Please see his website at www.copelandwoodwinds.com.

Peter Noy in America makes beautiful early woodwinds as well as various models of Irish flutes:  Peter Noy Flutes.

Michael Grinter of Australia makes beautiful recorders and keyed flutes:  M. Grinter Recorders and Flutes.

Ralph Sweet makes keyed and unkeyed flutes and whistles of all description:  Sweetheart Flutes.

Irish maker of wood and polymer Uillean Pipes, keyed and unkeyed concert flutes, and whistles:  Desi Seery.

Scottish maker of keyed and unkeyed wooden concert flutes:  George Ormiston

Irish maker of wooden and polymer keyed and unkeyed concert flutes:  Michael Cronnolly

Australian maker of wooden keyed and unkeyed flutes, also has a very nice page with much information on flutes including care instructions, fingering charts, and essays on flute-related topics:  Terry McGee

American maker of wooden keyed and unkeyed flutes, also a very nice and informative page, and also offers an ergonomic "long-Bb" key option to free up the left thumb to assist in holding the flute:  Casey Burns

Maker of beatiful and well-respected keyed and unkeyed Irish concert flutes, Chris Wilkes.  Has some lovely photographs of his work on this page.

Austrialian flutemaker of wooden concert flutes:  Mark Hoza's Kything Flutes

English flutemaker, makes keyed and unkeyed wooden concert flutes.  Site has beautiful close-up photos of his keywork:  Chris Wilkes

Maker of copies of Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, and keyed wooden flutes in many styles and models:  Rod Cameron

Irish maker of keyed and unkeyed wooden concert flutes, also makes an inexpensive "practice flute":  Hammy Hamilton

American makers of blackwood and rosewood concert flutes:  Dave Copley and Marlene Boegli.

Some of the loveliest hand-made Boehm system flutes in existence, ergonomically designed to minimize the health risks of playing the flute.  Has some of the loveliest closeup photos of flute keywork I've seen.  If you think metal flutes have to look like an intake manifold, you need to view this:  John Lunn Flutes.

I am fond of polymer flutes.  For Irish music, they are considered by many to be "inferior" to wooden instruments and are thus available at much lower prices (Cool!!!).  However, for a most expensive and very elegant Boehm-system flute rendered in space-age carbon-fiber polymers, please see:  Matit Flutes.

The Boehm-system flute I most often recommend to serious students, as well as the brand I encounter most often among "working class" advanced flautists who cannot afford a flute which costs more than their car:  Gemeinhardt Flutes and Piccolos .

 

Whistle Makers

The website of the manufacturer of the Feadog whisle can be found at www.feadog.ie.

Bill Whedon makes wonderful hand-made whistles with engraving:  www.serpentmusic.com .

Michael Burke makes some of the very best whistles made:  www.burkewhistles.com .

Other Places of Interest

Aaron Walden's page on whistles in worship:  Penny Whistle Praise.

For more information about all kinds of bagpipes than most folks would ever even want to know (and it's a way cool site!!!), check out The Universe of Bagpipes, a Nova Albion Research website.

iSciFisStory is a great message board for all things science fiction.  Give 'em a once-over and you'll be hooked forever.

NAAFA:  Are you disgusted with the $33+ billion dollar weight loss industry in America?  Have you ever experienced the humiliation of having a sales person ask you to leave their store because they don't sell clothes in (ahem) "that size"?  Have you ever received shamefully substandard medical care because of your weight?  Or did you just finally grow up and realize that how much a person weighs is the absolutely least important thing about them?  Then this is the site for you.

www.slashdot.org News for Nerds.  Stuff that Matters.

www.linux.org: the operating system that just might begin vital changes in the very paradigms our society is built upon

Electronic Frontier Foundation:  working to help keep the freedoms of speech and thought our forefathers fought and died to protect

Universalist Unitarian Association:  a religion that doesn't ask you to bow to conformity in order to have community,  Unitarian/Universalists are dedicated to affirming the inherent worth and dignity of every person.  This is a "come as you are" church, and is a safe and sane place.

www.34sp.com:  about the most inexpensive way to get high-quality web hosting without the hassles of using a "free" service (which usually limits file sizes, prohibits downloads and MP3 files, requires ad banners, etc), for about $17 a year.

www.redhat.com: Redhat Linux has achieved high levels of acceptance in the I.T. industry; also, about the easiest install of any Linux distribution. 

A-Live!:  information on the Sound Blaster Live! series of 3D sound cards.

www.cdrfaq.org: the best source of information on CD burners and CD-rewritable drives.

Connected:  An Internet Encyclopedia:  a collection of engineering essays and the entire set of RFC's which define the standards on which the Internet is based.  Everything on the site is available as a free download.

www.whatis.com:  another good source of I.T. information.  Has definitions for almost everything related to computing or the 'Net.

Hidden Features:  many DVD's contain "Easter Eggs" or unexpected content.  Here's a list of what has what and how to view it.

Sodaconstructor:  creates small animated creatures according to rules of gravity, strength, motion, etc you define.  Hard to describe; must be seen to be understood.

www.vmyths.cominformation on computer virus hoaxes, a searchable database, and urban legends.

www.homestead.orga good source of information on a variety of topics for those interested in homesteading, animal care, and the like.

www.flakehq.comEd Dewke's valuable resource page for those with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis.  Proof that humor is a healing thing!

www.quackwatch.com:  I get approached almost daily by well-meaning friends who are convinced that getting stung by bees cures arthritis, or being a vegetarian cures psoriasis, or any one of a hundred other "remedies" for various ailments.  Quackwatch is a valuable online service run by Dr. Stephen Barrett, and it debunks these and other health myths.